The second part of WAI Think Tank’s animated architectural narrative trilogy is out. 

Wall Stalker narrated the journey of three characters in search of the essence of architecture. After an exhausting odyssey from a city of icons to a mysterious wall, the wanderers were confronted with a blinding whiteness that not only blurred their hope to find what they were looking for, but put in question their true intentions.
 
Continuing where Wall Stalker left, the plot is resumed after the characters (now on a first person point of view) are washed in the whiteness of the wall they initially came to see in their search for answers. Once stricken by a white form of agnosia resulting from the purging experience of the mystical wall, the characters are unable to tell if what they think they see is either a memory of times past or unknown possibilities of new paths to be taken. Going through desolated landscapes, the characters face a dichotomy on which path to take: if the one that points to the uncertain abstraction reminiscing of the wall that left them confused or if to the clearly defined urban iconography that can be recognized in the distance. Once drawn by the hypnotizing sharpness of symbolism, the protagonists are sequestered inside Atlas, an urban maze of unremarkable buildings overlooked by four pyramidal monoliths, one of them containing what will make the wanderers discover—against their will—the last part of their journey.
 
More info: WAI Think Tank
nomadicity


” What if it was the body that gives meaning to space? ” @laperiferia /2012

In 1974 Pablo Neruda published his best-seller “The Book of Questions” : poems in the shape of questions, observing whatever surrounded him , with the wonder of a child. Is in this spirit that the proposal ” The ( New) Book of Questions” is founded: to observe , discuss and question the “territories in process” we live in, rather than to “answer” them. This questions will lead the author and reader into the realm of further observation and, if lucky, further questioning. The aim of this “book” is to become a device or tool for thinking,observing and understanding the city and landscape. Through the questioning of others we can see how the space is conformed somewhere else, or how others perceive the same space we live in.
You are the author of “The (New) Book of Questions.”
Submission guidelines. 
Send your question(s) regarding the territory to thenomad.mail@gmail.com with the Subject: Question. You can create your own question(s) or quote someone else ( send : author and year , if possible, or if it is a tweet, the link to it.). Include your name, country, website and/or Twitter user. Submissions can be in English or Spanish. 
“The (New) Book of Questions” is an on-going project. There is no deadline. All questions will be published here.

A project by nomadicity

” What if it was the body that gives meaning to space? ” @laperiferia /2012

In 1974 Pablo Neruda published his best-seller “The Book of Questions” : poems in the shape of questions, observing whatever surrounded him , with the wonder of a child. Is in this spirit that the proposal ” The ( New) Book of Questions” is founded: to observe , discuss and question the “territories in process” we live in, rather than to “answer” them. This questions will lead the author and reader into the realm of further observation and, if lucky, further questioning. The aim of this “book” is to become a device or tool for thinking,observing and understanding the city and landscape. Through the questioning of others we can see how the space is conformed somewhere else, or how others perceive the same space we live in.

You are the author of “The (New) Book of Questions.”

Submission guidelines.

Send your question(s) regarding the territory to thenomad.mail@gmail.com with the Subject: Question. You can create your own question(s) or quote someone else ( send : author and year , if possible, or if it is a tweet, the link to it.). Include your name, country, website and/or Twitter user. Submissions can be in English or Spanish.

“The (New) Book of Questions” is an on-going project. There is no deadline. All questions will be published here.

A project by nomadicity

KAOHSIUNG MARITIME CULTURE AND POPULAR MUSIC CENTER
790,000 sq.ft. program includes concert halls, exhibition spaces, a music incubator, interior and exterior public spaces, and administrative areas. The site encompasses an urban waterfront in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. International competition, 2010.
The twin poles of individual and collective life are everywhere present in pop music. From headphones to concerts, from musicians to the music industry, from downloaded songs to global distribution, pop music produces an endlessly changing dynamic across micro and macro scales. Its reverberations move nimbly among performers, audiences, and economies.
Circular Logic cultivates the agility of these cultural dynamics. The circular buildings that form program and public space slip into, out of, over, and under one another.
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Sarah Whiting will be present at Duetos | Congress organized by Arquine | Querétaro [Mexico] 13-14 September 2012

KAOHSIUNG MARITIME CULTURE AND POPULAR MUSIC CENTER

790,000 sq.ft. program includes concert halls, exhibition spaces, a music incubator, interior and exterior public spaces, and administrative areas. The site encompasses an urban waterfront in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. International competition, 2010.

The twin poles of individual and collective life are everywhere present in pop music. From headphones to concerts, from musicians to the music industry, from downloaded songs to global distribution, pop music produces an endlessly changing dynamic across micro and macro scales. Its reverberations move nimbly among performers, audiences, and economies.

Circular Logic cultivates the agility of these cultural dynamics. The circular buildings that form program and public space slip into, out of, over, and under one another.

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Sarah Whiting will be present at Duetos | Congress organized by Arquine | Querétaro [Mexico] 13-14 September 2012

FLOATING DE MAIO (Maria Charneco, Alfredo Lérida, Guillermo López, Anna Puigjaner) Seleccionado para la nueva edición de Arquia/Próxima.
El stand subvierte la formulación de dos conceptos tradicionalmente opuestos: su ligereza visual y física: con un peso de 30 Kg, el stand permite, mediante stocks de tubos de vidrio utilizados por la industria química, la formación de un techo continuo de 54 m2. Soportada por seis globos de helio de 3m. de diámetro, la instalación permite ser fácilmente transportada.
Más info: MAIO

FLOATING DE MAIO (Maria Charneco, Alfredo Lérida, Guillermo López, Anna Puigjaner) Seleccionado para la nueva edición de Arquia/Próxima.

El stand subvierte la formulación de dos conceptos tradicionalmente opuestos: su ligereza visual y física: con un peso de 30 Kg, el stand permite, mediante stocks de tubos de vidrio utilizados por la industria química, la formación de un techo continuo de 54 m2. Soportada por seis globos de helio de 3m. de diámetro, la instalación permite ser fácilmente transportada.

Más info: MAIO

quaderns

UTOPIA FACTORY ABRAXAS | Stéphane Degoutin [Quaderns #263 contributor], Gwenola Wagon, 2010.
Abraxas is the name of a gnostic god created by Basilides, an heretic religious teacher of the second century. The Basilidians did not believe in a magnanimous god, but rather in a demiurge, dual divinity. According to Carl Jung, Abraxas is “life and death in the same time. It engenders truth and lie, good and bad, light and darkness in the same word and in the same action”.
Thomas More first used the word Abraxas to name the island later known as “Utopia”. Presumably was he inspired by Erasmus’ Praise of Folly, in which Abraxas designates the city of the mad men. Only in the definitive version of his text did Thomas More coin the term “utopia”.
Utopia Factory is a research center where different utopias are experimented at full scale. Anyone can suggest a project. If it is accepted, a campaign is launched to find candidates for the experiment. The approach is empiric: the volunteers test the utopias for a period of a few months. In the event that it would not work as expected, they can experience another utopia, or come back to their previous lives.
More info: Socks Studio

—via quaderns

UTOPIA FACTORY ABRAXAS | Stéphane Degoutin [Quaderns #263 contributor], Gwenola Wagon, 2010.

Abraxas is the name of a gnostic god created by Basilides, an heretic religious teacher of the second century. The Basilidians did not believe in a magnanimous god, but rather in a demiurge, dual divinity. According to Carl Jung, Abraxas is “life and death in the same time. It engenders truth and lie, good and bad, light and darkness in the same word and in the same action”.

Thomas More first used the word Abraxas to name the island later known as “Utopia”. Presumably was he inspired by Erasmus’ Praise of Folly, in which Abraxas designates the city of the mad men. Only in the definitive version of his text did Thomas More coin the term “utopia”.

Utopia Factory is a research center where different utopias are experimented at full scale. Anyone can suggest a project. If it is accepted, a campaign is launched to find candidates for the experiment. The approach is empiric: the volunteers test the utopias for a period of a few months. In the event that it would not work as expected, they can experience another utopia, or come back to their previous lives.

More info: Socks Studio

—via quaderns

In attempting to redefine architecture as a living organism, the initial inspiration from natural and scientific processes concentrates on ideas of cyclical phase change and differentiation, all operating under the much larger umbrella of adaptability. The idea that this transformation is necessitated by climatic conditions, and thereby cyclical (or seasonal) is important, since it implies a feature of growth and compression. As such, nature of a fluctuating environment and the constant variations in the severity of the cycles produces a set of constant differentiations.
More info: Polar Ants —Artic Research Facility || via entropicIQ

In attempting to redefine architecture as a living organism, the initial inspiration from natural and scientific processes concentrates on ideas of cyclical phase change and differentiation, all operating under the much larger umbrella of adaptability. The idea that this transformation is necessitated by climatic conditions, and thereby cyclical (or seasonal) is important, since it implies a feature of growth and compression. As such, nature of a fluctuating environment and the constant variations in the severity of the cycles produces a set of constant differentiations.

More info: Polar Ants —Artic Research Facility || via entropicIQ